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Hospital services

Data source

National Public Hospitals Establishments Database (NPHED)

About the measure

MyHospitals shows selected services provided by individual hospitals, including specialised care units, in the 2016-17 reporting period. A specialised service unit is a facility or unit dedicated to the treatment or care of patients with particular conditions or characteristics, such as an intensive care unit. Types of specialised service unit include:

Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) unit - A specialised facility dedicated to the treatment of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) patients.

Acute renal dialysis unit - A specialised facility dedicated to dialysis of renal failure patients requiring acute care.

Acute spinal cord injury unit - A specialised facility dedicated to the initial treatment and subsequent ongoing management and rehabilitation of patients with acute spinal cord injury, largely conforming to Australian Health Minister’s Advisory Council guidelines for service provision.

Alcohol and drug unit - A facility/service dedicated to the treatment of alcohol and drug dependence.

Bone marrow transplantation unit - A specialised facility for bone marrow transplantation.

Burns unit (level III) - A specialised facility dedicated to the initial treatment and subsequent rehabilitation of the severely injured burns patient (usually >10 per cent of the patient’s body surface affected).

Cardiac surgery unit - A specialised facility dedicated to operative and peri-operative care of patients with cardiac disease.

Clinical genetics unit - A specialised facility dedicated to diagnostic and counselling services for clients who are affected by, at risk of, or anxious about genetic disorders.

Comprehensive epilepsy centre - A specialised facility dedicated to seizure characterisation, evaluation of therapeutic regimes, pre-surgical evaluation and epilepsy surgery for patients with refractory epilepsy.

Coronary care unit - A specialised facility dedicated to acute care services for patients with cardiac diseases.

Diabetes unit - A specialised facility dedicated to the treatment of diabetics.

Domiciliary care service - A facility/service dedicated to the provision of nursing or other professional paramedical care or treatment and non-qualified domestic assistance to patients in their own homes or in residential institutions not part of the establishment.

Geriatric assessment unit - Facilities dedicated to the Commonwealth-approved assessment of the level of dependency of (usually) aged individuals either for purposes of initial admission to a long-stay institution or for purposes of reassessment of dependency levels of existing long-stay institution residents.

Heart, lung transplantation unit - A specialised facility for heart including heart lung transplantation.

Hospice care unit - A facility dedicated to the provision of palliative care to terminally ill patients.

In-vitro fertilisation unit - A specialised facility dedicated to the investigation of infertility provision of in-vitro fertilisation services.

Infectious diseases unit - A specialised facility dedicated to the treatment of infectious diseases.

Intensive care unit (level III) - A specialised facility dedicated to the care of paediatric and adult patients requiring intensive care and sophisticated technological support services.

Liver transplantation unit - A specialised facility for liver transplantation.

Maintenance renal dialysis centre - A specialised facility dedicated to maintenance dialysis of renal failure patients. It may be a separate facility (possibly located on hospital grounds) or known as a satellite centre or a hospital-based facility but is not a facility solely providing training services.

Major plastic/reconstructive surgery unit - A specialised facility dedicated to general purpose plastic and specialised reconstructive surgery, including maxillofacial, microsurgery and hand surgery.

Neonatal intensive care unit (level III) - A specialised facility dedicated to the care of neonates requiring care and sophisticated technological support. Patients usually require intensive cardiorespiratory monitoring, sustained assistance ventilation, long-term oxygen administration and parenteral nutrition.

Neurosurgical unit - A specialised facility dedicated to the surgical treatment of neurological conditions.

Nursing home care unit - A facility dedicated to the provision of nursing home care.

Obstetric/maternity - A specialised facility dedicated to the care of obstetric/maternity patients.

Oncology unit, cancer treatment - A specialised facility dedicated to multidisciplinary investigation, management, rehabilitation and support services for cancer patients. Treatment services include surgery, chemotherapy and radiation.

Pancreas transplantation unit - A specialised facility for pancreas transplantation.

Psychiatric unit/ward - A specialised unit/ward dedicated to the treatment and care of admitted patients with psychiatric, mental, or behavioural disorders.

Rehabilitation unit - Dedicated units within recognised hospitals which provide post-acute rehabilitation and are designed as such by the State health authorities.

Renal transplantation unit - A specialised facility for renal transplantation.

Sleep centre - A specialised facility linked to a sleep laboratory dedicated to the investigation and management of sleep disorders.

Specialist paediatric - A specialised facility dedicated to the care of children aged 14 or less is provided within an establishment.

The information about services provided by a particular hospital is intended as a general guide only. There is the potential for some omissions or errors in this information and readers should contact a hospital directly for the latest advice on the services available.

Emergency Departments

Data source

National Non-admitted Patient Emergency Department Care Database (NNAPEDC)

In 2016–17, Victoria, Queensland and Western Australia provided data according to the Non-admitted patient emergency department care data set specification (NAPEDC DSS), while other states/territories provided data according to the Non-admitted patient emergency department care national minimum data set specification (NAPEDC NMDS).

About the measure

MyHospitals shows emergency departments offered by public hospitals, based on whether they are reported to the National Non-admitted Patient Emergency Department Care Database (NNAPEDC). Data should be reported to this database if the emergency department meets the following criteria:

  • Purposely designed and equipped area with designated assessment, treatment and resuscitation areas.
  • Ability to provide resuscitation, stabilisation and initial management of all emergencies.
  • Availability of medical staff in the hospital 24 hours a day.
  • Designated emergency department nursing staff 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, and a designated emergency department nursing unit manager.

Number of beds

Data source

National Public Hospitals Establishments Database (NPHED)

About the measure

The annual average number of beds available to be used by an admitted patient is grouped into the following categories: fewer than 50, 50–99, 100–199, 200–500, and more than 500. These data are as reported by states and territories to the NPHED, and are referred to in statistical publications (including Australian hospital statistics) as ‘average available beds’.

This is a combination of the number of beds, chairs or trolleys available to provide accommodation for same-day patients, averaged over the counting period, and the number of beds available to provide overnight accommodation for patients—other than neonatal cots (non-special-care) and beds occupied by hospital-in-the-home patients—averaged over the counting period.

The average available beds may differ from bed counts published elsewhere. For example, the average available beds over the reporting period may differ from bed numbers as at 30 June.

Comparability of bed numbers can be affected by the range and types of patients treated by a hospital. For example, hospitals may have different proportions of beds available for general versus special purposes (such as beds or cots used exclusively for intensive care). Bed counts also include chairs for same-day admissions.